Dirac versus Connecting Dots

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Some of the games released by Mediocre AB can point to their fascination of dynamic zooming background surrounding dots and clever puzzle games. Smash Hit was one of the captivating examples and the latest to join the bandwagon is Dirac. Ever since its release, people have been fascinated with Dirac, branding it with all sort of tags like ‘Space Age of Join the Dots’, ‘Connecting Puzzler’ or even ‘Sort the Dot Microverse’. If you have ever played Connect the Dots and Two Dots, then you too would feel the whole fascination. Here’s why.

The Game:

As compared to Smash Hit, Dirac is set in with completely different gameplay set in a different flow and pace, but you may get the nostalgic feel of the visuals in other sibling games. The game is not very fast paced but the excitement is added by intricate puzzle solving by connecting dots.
Yeah I know. Right now you may be thinking as to what is so puzzling about connecting dots? But wait. Dirac is not some static game when you keep connecting two points of puzzle. It has the most methodical yet dynamic interface. The game’s definition on the store is put up as – “Through phase-distorted intermodulation inference you will be able to manually disentangle and sort through the macroscopic existence of the Microverse.” Well that sounds complicated if not completely unintelligible. However we would try to explain this in a very simple fashion.

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To begin with, the game is named after a scientist name Dirac who is famous for his contribution towards the field of Quantum Particles. True to the puzzle solving theme, the whole look-and-feel of the game is quite geeky. While the main gameplay involves connecting Dots, the dynamic flow is similar to the game Smash Hit. You get a cluster of blue and red dots that zoom out from the centre and you need to connect the dots of the same colour to fill the grid. In the centre lies the pulsating atom-like particle which continuously keeps emitting particles of different colours. You are tasked with connecting them as soon as possible before they escape the screen. If the points escape, it costs you valuable points.

The game is kept flexible which allows for connecting even as less as only two points together, but the incentive is incrementally higher if you connect more. The added multiplier advantage lets you score higher in case you are able to connect all in a circle along with the particle in the centre. It’s similar to scoring a ‘Home Run’.

Well, that seems simple. Isn’t it? No. The twist in the otherwise superfluous tale includes the dots of different colour that keeps popping in between while connecting the lines, the nucleus, the incoming obstacles as a result of expanding circle of Dots and so on. The obstacles are special, somewhat like meteors which can be encircled to boost your score.

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Dots, on the other hand is a puzzle game with a grid of different coloured dots laid out in a square grid and you need to take these dots out in certain patterns like a line, rectangle or square. Once you join the dots they are taken out and replaced with the ones directly above it as new dots fill the square grid. The gameplay here is simple without any dynamism except new dots added on. The biggest difference between Dirac and Dots is the time you get to decide to move (unless you are playing the Timer mode on Dots). The ever changing background of Dirac leaves very little time for you to think over your strategy and compels you to think on your feet.

Graphics and Controls

Dirac bears a vivid space background with dots and centre particle looking all scientific, giving out a perception that it needs more skills or brains to play. As such the background is clutter free. The subtle luminesce of background gives a floating-galaxy feel. Your scores are highlighted in dim blue each time you score or lose points. The colours are muted but the blue and red almost resembles the bright saber light that keeps the focus on dots. The Graphics on Dots is further simplistic with colourful candy dots filled in a white background. If you feel funky, you can change it to black as well.

The controls are swipe-dominated. In Dirac you may try to cover the whole area as the dots spread through the whole screen. Whereas in Dots you just need to try and figure to take down the dots in cluster together. In either case the touch-and-swipe is executed pretty well.

Final Verdict:

 

The game runs in small-bursts which may seem endless with continuing levels that just makes it ideal for quick-play for short-sessions to either kill boredom or time. Also the game just tracks your high scores, which you may end up chasing again as it does not store your level progress. The philosophy of Dirac is pretty laid back and focused on a single-task – connecting dots before it zooms out completely. The paid version of the game is available with no Ads and no in-App purchases. On the contrary, Dots is available for free and has the same gameplay with a slight twist.

Overall, Dirac looks exciting and fresh even with a simple premise as it doesn’t pack much content but offers a good and engaging time-kill. But even for that, whether to go for a paid version is a personal call that people should take on individual basis.